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Generic Name: esterified estrogens

It is mostly used as hormone replacement in menopausal women
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What is this medicine?

ESTERIFIED ESTROGENS (es TAIR i fyed ES troe jenz) is an estrogen. It is mostly used as hormone replacement in menopausal women. It helps to treat hot flashes and prevent osteoporosis. It is also used to treat women with low hormone levels or in those who have had their ovaries removed. This medicine may also be used in the treatment of breast or prostate cancer.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have or ever had any of these conditions:
  • abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • blood vessel disease or blood clots
  • breast, cervical, endometrial, ovarian, liver, or uterine cancer
  • dementia
  • diabetes
  • gallbladder disease
  • heart disease or recent heart attack
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • high level of calcium in the blood
  • hysterectomy
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • migraine headaches
  • stroke
  • systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • tobacco smoker
  • vaginal bleeding
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to estrogens, other hormones, medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take this medicine at the same time each day. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

A patient package insert for the product will be given with each prescription and refill. Read this sheet carefully each time. The sheet may change frequently.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:
  • aromatase inhibitors like aminoglutethimide, anastrozole, exemestane, letrozole, testolactone

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • barbiturates, such as phenobarbital
  • carbamazepine
  • clarithromycin
  • erythromycin
  • grapefruit juice
  • medicines used to treat fungal infections like ketoconazole and itraconazole
  • rifabutin, rifampin, or rifapentine
  • ritonavir
  • St. John's Wort

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. You will need a regular breast and pelvic exam and Pap smear while on this medicine. You should also discuss the need for regular mammograms with your health care professional, and follow his or her guidelines for these tests.

This medicine can make your body retain fluid, making your fingers, hands, or ankles swell. Your blood pressure can go up. Contact your doctor or health care professional if you feel you are retaining fluid.

If you have any reason to think you are pregnant, stop taking this medicine right away and contact your doctor or health care professional.

Smoking increases the risk of getting a blood clot or having a stroke while you are taking this medicine, especially if you are more than 35 years old. You are strongly advised not to smoke.

If you wear contact lenses and notice visual changes, or if the lenses begin to feel uncomfortable, consult your eye doctor or health care professional.

This medicine can increase the risk of developing a condition (endometrial hyperplasia) that may lead to cancer of the lining of the uterus. Taking progestins, another hormone drug, with this medicine lowers the risk of developing this condition. Therefore, if your uterus has not been removed (by a hysterectomy), your doctor may prescribe a progestin for you to take together with your estrogen. You should know, however, that taking estrogens with progestins may have additional health risks. You should discuss the use of estrogens and progestins with your health care professional to determine the benefits and risks for you.

If you are going to have surgery, you may need to stop taking this medicine. Consult your health care professional for advice before you schedule the surgery.

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Note: This information is not intended to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions, or adverse effects for this drug. If you have question about the drug(s) you are taking, check with your health care professional.
 
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