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Generic Name: mannitol

It is used to reduce pressure and swelling around the brain and in the eyes
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What is this medicine?

MANNITOL (MAN i tawl) is a diuretic. It is used to reduce pressure and swelling around the brain and in the eyes. It is also used to prevent or treat kidney failure. This medicine is also used during some urology procedures.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • bleeding in the brain, head injury or trauma
  • dehydration
  • fluid on the lungs
  • heart failure
  • kidney disease
  • small amount of urine output
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to mannitol, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for infusion into a vein or into the urethra. It is given by a health care professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 12 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • levomethadyl
  • lithium
  • other diuretics

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

You will be monitored closely while you are on this medicine.

You may need to be on a special diet while taking this medicine. Check with your doctor. Also, ask how many glasses of fluid you need to drink a day. You must not get dehydrated.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this drug affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:
  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue
  • breathing problems
  • changes in vision
  • chest pain
  • confusion
  • fast, irregular heartbeat
  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls
  • fever or chills
  • increased thirst
  • irritation, pain at site where injected
  • muscle pain, weakness
  • seizures
  • swelling of the ankles, feet, hands
  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine
  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea
  • dry mouth
  • headache
  • nausea, vomiting
  • runny nose
  • skin sores

Where should I keep my medicine?

This drug is given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.


All visitors to AARP.org should seek expert medical care and consult their own physicians for any specific health issues. Read this disclaimer in its entirety.
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Note: This information is not intended to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions, or adverse effects for this drug. If you have question about the drug(s) you are taking, check with your health care professional.
 
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