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Drug Allergy Drugs

Drug Allergy Treatments

If you have an allergic reaction to a drug, the first step is to stop taking that medication. You may also need additional medication to ease any uncomfortable symptoms. Serious allergic reactions, such as anaphylaxis, require immediate medical attention.

There are several medications available to treat drug allergies. Contact your doctor if believe you are having an allergic reaction to your medication.

Antihistamines

For mild symptoms such as a rash, hives, and itching, over-the-counter or first-generation antihistamines can be effective. These drugs may cause drowsiness. First generation antihistamines include:

  • brompheniramine (Dimetapp)
  • dimenhydrinate (Dramamine)
  • diphenhydramine (Benadryl, Sominex)
  • doxylamine (Vicks NyQuil)

Second-generation antihistamines, which have fewer or no such effects, are now recommended by many doctors. These include:

  • cetirizine (Zyrtec)
  • desloratadine (clarinex)
  • fexofenadine (allegra)
  • loratadine (Alavert, Claritin)

Bronchodilator

A bronchodilator can help when main symptoms include wheezing or coughing. Examples of bronchodilators include:

  • albuterol (ProAir HFA, Ventolin HFA)
  • formoterol (Foradil Aerolizer)
  • salmeterol (Serevent Diskus)
  • theophylline (Uniphyl, Theo-24, Theo-Dur)

Corticosteroids

Corticosteroids can be taken by mouth, intravenous injection, or applied directly to the skin. They act more slowly than antihistamines, but last longer and can provide relief from some of the more serious symptoms of a drug allergy. These include:

  • beclomethasone (Becona)
  • fluticasone furoate (Veramyst)
  • fluticasone propionate (Flonase)
  • mometasone (Nasonex)

Epinephrine

In acute anaphylaxis cases, epinephrine should be taken by injection as soon as possible. An emergency medical response team will be able to administer an emergency dose of epinephrine.


Content licensed from:

Written by: the Healthline Editorial Team
Medically reviewed on: Oct 06, 2014: George Krucik, MD, MBA

This feature is for informational purposes only and should not be used to replace the care and information received from your health care provider. Please consult a health care professional with any health concerns you may have.
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