Symptom Checker

SYMPTOM CHECKER

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POSSIBLE CAUSES FOR YOUR SYMPTOMS
Search Results for 'Decreased urine output.' Adding another symptom to the list above may reduce the number of possible causes.
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1.  Decreased Urine Output
Oliguria is the medical term for a decreased output of urine. This is clinically defined as an output of below 400 millilitres (~16 ounces) of urine over the course of 24 hours. If you are still urinating in any amount...
Symptoms:
  • Decreased urine output
2.  End-Stage Kidney Disease
A diagnosis of end-stage kidney disease means that you are in the final stage of kidney disease, and your kidneys are not functioning well enough to meet the needs of daily life. Your kidneys are responsible fo...
Symptoms:
  • Decreased urine output
  • Bruises
  • Headache
  • Seizures
  • Jaundice
3.  Hypovolemic Shock
Hypovolemic shock is a life-threatening condition that results when you lose more than 20 percent (one-fifth) of your body's blood or fluid supply. This severe fluid loss makes it impossible for the heart to pum...
This condition is considered a medical emergency. Urgent care may be required.
Symptoms:
  • Decreased urine output
  • Ataxia
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Numbness
4.  Urethral Stricture
Urethral stricture is a medical condition that mainly affects men. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), very few women get urethral strictures. In addition, very few individuals are born with thi...
Symptoms:
  • Decreased urine output
  • Urethral discharge
  • Pain
  • Blood in semen
  • Painful ejaculation
5.  Dehydration
Dehydration occurs when your body loses more fluid than you drink. When the body loses too much water, organs, cells, and tissues fail to function. Dehydration can also cause shock. Severe dehydration must be treate...
This condition is considered a medical emergency. Urgent care may be required.
Symptoms:
  • Decreased urine output
  • Headache
  • Abnormal urine odor
  • Coma
  • No urine output
6.  Kidney Failure
Your kidneys are a pair of organs located toward your lower back of the body, on either side of the spine. Your kidneys' main function is to act as a filtration system for your blood and to remove toxins from you...
Symptoms:
  • Decreased urine output
  • Loss of appetite
  • Decrease in appetite
  • Headache
  • High blood pressure
7.  Glomerulonephritis
The glomeruli are structures in your kidneys made up of tiny blood vessels. These knots of vessels help filter blood and remove excess fluid. If your glomeruli are damaged, your kidneys will stop longer work properly...
Symptoms:
  • Decreased urine output
  • Itching
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Lethargy
  • Malaise
8.  Obstructive Uropathy
Obstructive uropathy is a condition in which your urine flow reverses direction. Instead of flowing from the kidneys to the bladder, the urine "refluxes" back into the kidneys. Reflux literally means "a flowing back o...
Symptoms:
  • Decreased urine output
  • Moist skin
  • Chronic pain
  • Swollen ankle
  • Edema
9.  Heart Failure
Heart failure is characterized by the heart's inability to pump an adequate supply of blood. Without sufficient blood flow, all major body functions are disrupted. Heart failure is a collection of symptoms and problem...
Symptoms:
  • Decreased urine output
  • Loss of appetite
  • Swollen feet
  • Weight loss
  • Cough
10.  Acute Nephritis
Think of your kidneys as your body's filters, a sophisticated waste removal system comprised of two bean-shaped organs. Every day, your hard working kidneys process 200 quarts of blood in a day and remove two quarts o...
Symptoms:
  • Decreased urine output
  • Lethargy
  • Malaise
  • Coma
  • Leg cramps
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